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Expanded Access

Bringing Research and Patients Together

Our Expanded Access platform is meant to do two things:

  1. Empower patients with access to new treatments that are in clinical research.
  2. Empower further research with clinical data from those patients.

For someone with a quick-killer disease, participating in clinical research may be the only way to access a new medicine that might help him live longer.  He may be willing to accept some uncertainty, considering the alternative.  So for patients, there’s a lot of overlap between treatment exploration and research.

But what about patients who cannot get into clinical trials?  Can they still take part in research and explore investigational treatment?

Yes, they can, but only through what are called Expanded Access programs (EAPs).  These are meant to include a much broader group of patients than traditional clinical trials, sometimes exclusively those patients who don’t meet clinical trial enrollment criteria or who otherwise cannot get into trials.

ALS-ETF is bringing a new kind of Expanded Access to the ALS community, to make a groundbreaking impact in the treatment landscape for patients as well as the research that’s powered by patient data.

Learn more about Expanded Access programs here.

Learn more about our research goals here.